The juvenile Egyptian vulture named Groshko, now equipped with satellite transmitter [ 2011-08-08 10:56:56 ]

 

On 4th August 2011 in the Nature Park “Rusenski Lom” BSPB team tagged a satellite transmitter to a juvenile Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus). The Administration of the park gave him the name Groshko.

The tagging of the transmitter is part of implementation of contract between the Directorate of the park and BSPB. The other planned actions are tagging of radio transmitter to juvenile Eagle Owl and satellite transmitter to a juvenile Black Stork, which was done in the beginning of July (http://bspb.org/show2.php?id=1947&menu_id=33).

The Egyptian vulture is one of the most emblematic and valuable birds in our country. Incredibly beautiful, with elegant plumage and noble hairstyle, it has turned to one of the emblematic birds for Bulgarian nature conservation. Unfortunately, because of complex of threats, mainly the poising, poaching and mortality along the migratory flyway, nowadays the Egyptian vultures are one of the most threatened species in the world. The national population of the species barely exceeds 30 pairs. BSPB, jointly with other nature conservation organizations and government institutions take care about their conservation. The activities spread even out of Bulgarians borders – in Sudan (http://www.neophron.bspb.org/news-en/101011.html) and Ethiopia (http://www.neophron.bspb.org/news-en/101222.html). Putting of the satellite transmitter will give us additional information about the threats, the migratory flyway and the wintering places of the bird, which is very important for planning of the future conservation actions.

In the last year BSPB put another satellite transmitter to the small Egyptian vulture –Spartacus from the Eastern Rhodopes. Spartacus reached Chad in Central Africa, where unfortunately it died. More about his story you can find below:

The small vulture Spartacus shows us the wintering places of its relatives:

http://www.neophron.bspb.org/news-en/101119.html

The juvenile Spartacus and its mission:

http://www.neophron.bspb.org/docs/2010_za_egipetskiq_le6oqd_s_trevoga

The end of the mission of the small Egyptian vulture Spartacus: http://www.neophron.bspb.org/docs/2011_Angelov_neophron_satellite_Chad.pdf

During the tagging of the transmitter Groshko showed that he has good dose of courage and will for life. We wish him a successful fledging and tailwind along the full with threats way to Africa.

For more information visit the webpage “Conservation and research of the Egyptian vulture in Bulgaria” ( www.neophron.bspb.org)


1.	Groshko shows how dangerous he is, staying at the bottom of the nest cave before the tagging of the transmitter 2.	Tagging of the satellite transmitter 3.	The transmitter with contact information written on it
1. Groshko shows how dangerous he is, staying at the bottom of the nest cave before the tagging of the transmitter 2. Tagging of the satellite transmitter 3. The transmitter with contact information written on it
4.	Among all Egyptian vultures in Bulgaria, Groshko and his parents live in the largest apartment 5.	Groshko in a relaxation process after the tagging
4. Among all Egyptian vultures in Bulgaria, Groshko and his parents live in the largest apartment 5. Groshko in a relaxation process after the tagging